Horse Racing Betting and Odds

Getting to Grips with the Sport of Kings

There’s a reason why horse racing is considered to be the ‘sport of kings’, with the first jockey himself a monarch and the discipline synonymous with variation of generations of royal family in the UK.

Throughout the ages, however, horse racing has also become popular with everyday punters, with a staggering 97.4% of those who watch the sport wagering regularly on their favourite events.

If you’re horse racing betting today, the chances are you’ll wager online, and if this is the case then the Mark Jarvis platform is tailormade for you. After all, we feature daily race meetings from the UK, Ireland and beyond, including iconic jump race events like the Cheltenham Festival in March and April’s Grand National to the Royal Ascot flat race meeting.

We also offer a huge range of markets to our punters, who can capitalise through various different types of bet.

Our Horse Racing FAQ

How Should I Bet on Horses?

If you’ve ever asked how to bet on horses, we’d wager that you’re not alone. You’ve come to the right place, however, as it’s easier than ever to bet on your favourite runners through our website.

It helps if you’re a student of form and have a passion for horse racing, of course, and from here you simply need to register for a new account and credit your account. You can even qualify for a welcome bonus as a new player, so check out or site to find out more.

It’s also important to understand the lingo used as part of horse racing betting, as this helps you to understand some of the available markets and types of wager.

How Do you Work Out Horse Racing Odds?

Horse racing odds today are much the same as they were before, particularly in terms of how they’re calculated and presented to punters.

In simple terms, if you stake the number on the right of the fractional odds and your wager is successful, you’ll earn the digit on the left in profit. When your racing bet is odds-against, the number on the left will be greater than the one on the right and this will deliver a significantly higher return.

Conversely, wagers that are odds-on are presented with the number on the right being larger, so your profit will always be less than your total stake.

This is why odds-on wagers are reserved for race favourites, whereas the chasing pack will always be odds-against as they have less chance of winning.

I’ve Heard the Term SP Used in Horse Race Betting – What Does This Mean?

The term ‘SP’ in horse racing betting refers to each runner’s starting price, which are the odds published at the time the race begins.

Prices can vary wildly in the build-up to a race, depending on the number of bets placed and which horses receive the most backing.

Regardless of the starting price, however, you’ll always receive the odds that were live at the time you placed your bet online.

What’s the Difference Between the Single Win Bet and Each-way Betting?

The most straightforward way of wagering on horse races is the single win bet, which requires you to simply back selection to finish ahead of the field.

This is just one of the many ways in which you can wager on horse racing, however, with each-way betting offering a viable alternative that lets you offset some of your risk.

But what does each-way mean when betting? This refers to the practice of placing two bets on any horse you’ve selected; one to win and another to place (or finish within the top two, three or four depending on the number of runners). Whilst the win element of the wager pays out at the odds quoted, a place finish delivers a predetermined fraction of the starting price.

Each-way betting represents an excellent way of recouping some of your initial stake, particularly when you’re backing an outside runner in a competitive field.

What is a Trixie in Horse Racing Betting?

One of the more complex types of horse racing wager is known colloquially as a ‘Trixie’ bet.

This describes a full cover bet that enables you to pick three horses that you think have a chance of winning a particular race, before turning these selections into four separate wagers.

These take the form of three doubles and a treble, whilst it multiplies you stake by four in relation to the exact number of bets placed. You need at least two winners to cash in, and this type of bet can deliver big returns to savvy punters.

What’s a Lucky 15 Bet?

Another incredibly popular wager is the Lucky 15, which as the name suggests is comprised of 15 individual bets of the same stake on a total of four runners.

This includes four singles, three trebles, six doubles and a four-fold, whilst it’s a fans’ favourite as you can earn small returns for a single and potentially huge gains if you land multiple winners!

What Does Nap Mean in Horse Betting?

If you regularly check out the latest horse racing betting news and odds, you’ve probably heard the word ‘nap’ used regularly.

This refers to a tipster’s selection as the best bet of the day, and it’s arguably the closest you’ll get to a sure-thing in the world of horse race wagering.

Popular pundits like Rory Delargy and Andy Holding regularly publish carefully selected naps online, whilst there are even resources that help you to compare these and see which experts you should follow in the future.